Monday, March 23, 2015

Lecture on Deming's Quest




As regular readers know I'm teaching portions of the masters level BIM Strategy course at Middlesex University in London. My next lecture will focus on Deming and his quest for continuous improvement. The lecture connects threads of thought pioneered by Deming and others to the lean construction processes applied by forward thinkers in construction today. The excerpt below captures Deming's thoughts on systems and forms the core of the lecture.

Deming viewed organizations as systems. Defining a system as a network of interdependent components striving for the same goal, Deming envisioned systems in which everyone gains, from shareholders, to customers, suppliers, employees, the community and the environment. Deming analogized to an orchestra to illustrate the concept, noting, “An orchestra is judged by listeners, not so much by illustrious players, but by the way they work together. The conductor, as manager, begets cooperation between the players, as a system, every player to support the others. There are other aims for an orchestra, such as joy in work for the players and the conductor.”

Viewing an organization as a system compels consideration of internal and external connections and interactions and eliminates silos. An integrated approach achieves real success by improving the quality of its products and services, to raising the entire esprit de corps of a company.

Is the system that makes up your organization healthy? Is it ready to deliver planning, design and construction services collaboratively in an integrated trust based environment?

Soon Collaborative Construction will announce a new initiative that focuses on solutions to the core problems faced by built industry professionals that want to operate in a trust based environment that supports and rewards BIM enabled planning, design and construction services in an IPD environment. I will keep readers informed as the initiative unfolds.
 

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Thursday, February 26, 2015

More Climate McCarthyism from Science Deniers




Science Deniers and well paid advocates of Anthropogenic Global Warming / Climate Change freaked out last week because the evil Koch brothers - among others - provided $1.2 million in funding to Willie Soon, a prominent skeptic of AGW.  The Guardian hyperventilated this headline "Work of Prominent Climate Skeptic Funded by Enery Industry" and the excerable Democratic representative from Arizona, Grijalva, quickly fired off a letter to 7 other prominent Climate Skeptic inquiring, "Are you Now or Have you Ever Been a Climate Skeptic"

This high dungeon by these Ass Clowns would be funny if it were not actually having its intended effect of chilling debate and driving real scientists, like Roger Pielke Jr. of the University of Colorado out of the field.  Peilke, one of those named by the excerable Grijalva's as a Climate Denier, wrote a blog post title "I am Under Investigation" detailing the incident in which he proclaims his intention to abandon the field to these fools.  I hope he does not, but his frustration is understandable.

Why the Science Deniers who advocate reducing carbon emissions by 80% by 2050 - which would require the US to cut carbon emissions from 6 billion metric tons to approximately 1.2 billion metric tons, a per capita emission rate last experienced in the US in 1905-1910 - are flinging poo and rocks in the glass house of research funding is beyond me.  At least one journalists, Henry Payne in the article "Global Warming: Follow the Money", honed in on glass house argument.  Maybe these McCarthy style witch hunts will prompt more such investigations and the media will delve into the source of funding for the Science Deniers who advocate reducing carbon emissions by 80% by 2050 in hopes of slowing global warming by about 1.0 Degree Celsius over the next 100 years while they simultaneously agree that neither India nor China intend to commit economic suicide by depriving millions of their citizens of access to Hans Rosling's Magic Washing Machine.

I've always argued that Liberty, aka private property rights, Capitalism and Cheap Energy raise more people out of poverty than anything else.  And Hans Rosling's discussion of the Magic Washing Machine reinforces that argument. Let's hope the Science Deniers and the McCarthy style supporters fail in their latest efforts to stifle scientific debate.



Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
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Wednesday, February 18, 2015

Designing for the Internet of Things




Professor Rodolphe el-Khoury has been selected as the new Dean of Architecture at the University of Miami.  He presented at the TEDx conference in Toronto where he discussed the concept of Designing for the Internet of Things.  Interesting thoughts.


Lots if interesting thoughts.


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Wednesday, February 11, 2015

3D Printer Prints Houses in China




More grist for the 3D Printer mill and the never ending uses of concrete.

A Chinese company uses a 3D-printer to print houses for rapid assembly in China.  Printing components from a mixture of sand, concrete and glass fiber, all materials processed from common construction waste, the process holds promise.

The commercial 3D printer used is over 6 meters tall and 32 meters long.

The video isn't the most slick production you'll ever see, but it will be of interest to most. 

 


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Friday, January 9, 2015

A Harsh Assessment of Architecture




I've been pleading with my architect clients for years to pay attention to the emergence of new virtual planning and design tools and, more importantly, the way those tools are being used to increase efficiency and productivity in the planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance of facilities and infrastructure over time.  Too many of those clients continue to ignore the impact of these new tools and processes and too many of them are ceding their seat at the table with the owners to general contractors.  Why architects refuse to embrace these new tools and processes has vexed me, but I continue to work with stakeholders in the built industry - including architects - who are prepared to move forward and improve the built industry as a whole.

The article excerpted and linked below addresses the insular mindset of modern architecture and provides insights into the angst felt in the profession. The clash between the architect's vision, the owners needs and the contractors ability to build what the architect designs speaks to the need for additional collaboration on the front end of projects. Anyone interested in forming an integrated team to pursue their next project should give me a call.  Meanwhile, the article excerpted and linked below may be of interest to stakeholders in the built industry who wonder why architects continue to resist the practical nuts and bolts effect of virtual planning, design, construction, costing, scheduling, operations and maintenance empowered by the effective use of BIM tools in an integrated project delivery (IPD) environment.

Architecture is suffering a crisis of confidence. More and more mainstream figures in the field are admitting that the profession has lost its way. As I previously mentioned, Frank Gehry, the world’s most famous architect, recently said that “98% of everything that is built and designed today is pure sh*t. There’s no sense of design, no respect for humanity or for anything else.” Architectural thought-leaders seconded and thirded him. And he’s since been fourthed by another. 
Last year, recognizing general public’s low opinion of architects, the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the trade organization for the profession, launched aneffort to “reposition” the industry by hiring marketing and brand-identity firms. (You can find a PDF of one of the Institute’s public opinion polls here.) 
And now The New York Times, the ultimate arbiter of elite opinion, recentlypublished an op-ed that declared, “For too long, our profession [architecture] has flatly dismissed the general public’s take on our work, even as we talk about making that work more relevant with worthy ideas like sustainability, smart growth and ‘resilience planning.’” The authors are not kooks on the fringe but architect Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, former executive editor of Metropolis magazine, both of them very much in the establishment.




Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
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Monday, December 29, 2014

Utica Shale Paying Off for Ohio




Long time readers may recall a post from 2011 in which I wondered whether the Utica Shale formation, which unlike the shallower Marcellus Shale formation, extends well into Ohio, would be developed and become an economic boon to eastern Ohio. See, Uitca Bigger than Marcellus? It looks like that is exactly what has happened.

Below is an image reflecting the rise in production in the Utica since 2007, along with a map showing the Ohio counties beneath which the formation has been tapped to date.  My understanding is that portions of the formation extend all the way into Indiana as well, and that it can be tapped throughout the Marcellus by deepening existing wells in that formation.


Production in the Utica took off in 2014 and promises to be larger still in 2015.  The article linked below briefly summarizes the current state of affairs.  As I explained in a separate post that year cheap energy from cheap natural gas is likely to fuel renewed interest in manufacturing in Ohio and Pennsylvania.

Thanks to enhanced oil and gas recovery techniques the United States has become a force to be reckoned with in the international oil and gas market.  Our mature pipeline system and vast untapped reserves in the Green River / Fossil / Great Divide / Whashakie / Piceane and Uinta Formations in Colorado, Wyoming and Utah render us energy independent. It will be interesting to see how this impacts our foreign policy over the next 100 years.

  


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Carbon Dioxide, Coal, Oil & Gas




If global warming represents real danger then real solutions must be considered.  Instead, science deniers who insist the world is warming - even though it's not - refuse to embrace nuclear power and insist on policies that make carbon based energy more expensive. Likewise, many of these charlatans reject enhanced oil recovery out of hand. That is a big mistake. 

Enhanced oil recovery, a kissing cousin to fracking for natural gas, has the potential to reduce carbon emissions more effectively than any processes devised to date. The article excerpted and linked below makes a powerful case for subsidizing the process as a means of leveraging coal reserves, extending the life of existing oil fields, creating a whole new industrial sector while simultaneously rendering energy derived from coal and oil carbon neutral.

In essences, the article argues for an energy policy the supports and enables decarbonization rather than existing policies that increase the cost of fossil fuels while doing little to reduce carbon emissions.  The excerpt below describes the process.

Drillers have long understood that they leave most of their product in the ground. As oil is pumped, the pressure underground drops and it becomes harder to extract what remains. Typically, only about one-third of the oil in a given location can be economically removed. As a result, many supposedly “depleted” wells actually still contain most of their oil​—​just waiting for a technology that will make it economical to extract it.  
In the early 1970s, drillers in west Texas figured out how to do just that, and the remarkable secret to their success was carbon dioxide. Pumping carbon dioxide into depleted wells not only increases the pressure, it also acts as a solvent, helping to separate oil from the cavities in the rock where it is trapped and the water it is often mixed with. This process enables oil companies to extract as much as another third of a site’s oil​—​essentially doubling a well’s productivity. 
One might think that such a remarkable technology would be an overnight sensation. But in fact, we are nowhere near capitalizing upon EOR’s full potential. Since the 1970s, oil companies have injected about a billion tons of carbon dioxide into “depleted” wells, producing roughly 2.5 billion barrels of oil. About 6 percent of the oil produced in America is now extracted using this technique. We know it works​—​but it’s still a niche market. 
What’s holding us back? A shortage of carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide used in EOR operations is predominantly geologic​—​companies tap into underground deposits and extract CO2 for enhanced oil recovery and other commercial applications. That’s how it’s been done since the 1970s, but two important things have changed in recent years. Climate change has become the preeminent environmental concern, and new studies have shown that there is much more oil reachable through EOR than had been previously understood​—​so much so that geologic carbon dioxide supplies aren’t nearly sufficient. If we want to get that oil, we’ll have to capture carbon dioxide from industrial sources, such as coal-fired power plants. 
Which brings us to the interesting place we find ourselves today: Our nation’s top environmental goal is reducing carbon dioxide emissions. And one of our top energy priorities is maximizing production from domestic oil reserves. Capturing carbon dioxide from power plants and using it for EOR could produce billions of barrels of oil while simultaneously putting billions of tons of carbon dioxide underground forever. Yet policymakers are doing next to nothing to take advantage of this unique opportunity. Instead, Washington is preparing to fight a pitched legal and political battle over proposed EPA power plant regulations that will, even if implemented, make barely a dent in America’s carbon emissions.

Read the whole thing.  The author walks you through the history, the policy and the economics of enhanced oil recovery in a well reasoned essay that will leave advocates and opponents of AGW theories wondering why we aren't aggressively pursuing the policies outlined therein.

In the conclusion the author contends:

Carbon utilization is not receiving nearly the attention it deserves. We should be having a national conversation about enhanced oil recovery; instead, we are obsessed with issues that are almost trivial in comparison. The basic facts of the matter seem clear: Carbon capture and sequestration is probably indispensable to any pragmatic approach to decarbonization, and EOR appears to be the only practical way to underwrite the extensive up-front costs of developing carbon capture and sequestration technologies, infrastructure, and markets. 
Using carbon capture and sequestration to enable enhanced oil recovery is the path to keeping coal in our energy economy while simultaneously achieving our environmental goals; without it, we are likely to lose both battles. The choice is between a declining-but-not-disappearing coal industry that can’t invest in innovation and a thriving, productive industry that could develop effective carbon management technologies. EOR could produce tens of billions of barrels of oil in America while sequestering billions of tons of carbon dioxide and driving over $800 billion in investments in decarbonization and energy production technologies. And it would establish a different model for meeting the climate challenge: Make decarbonization technologies affordable and productive rather than trying to make carbon-intensive energy more expensive.

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Warp Drive in an Omaha Garage?




The story linked below briefly describes the theory underlying the concept. Interesting work being done by Pares in his garage, that's for sure.


There is a video interview with Pares at the end of the linked article


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Charitable Doll House Project in Cincinnati





Join ACI in Bringing a Smart Built Culture to Cincinnati
One Doll House at a Time!

Transitioning from an industrial economy to a knowledge economy presents challenges and opportunities.  Deploying planning, design and construction tools virtually and physically is a challenge; leveraging the experience of others who’ve done so is an opportunity.  ACI’s digital plan room initiative opens a window into the knowledge economy for those who participate in the Charitable Doll House Project.  Contact Linda Bach at ACI to reserve a seat at a kick off session in February, 2015.

Two game changers accelerate the built industry’s transition to the knowledge economy.  Building Information Modeling, (BIM) a digital planning and design process that enables virtual planning, design and construction, and Integrated Project Delivery, (IPD) a procurement and delivery strategy that empowers teams operating in the built environment to collaborate on delivery of planning, design and construction services.   The Charitable Doll House Project will teach members to leverage BIM and IPD as game changers in construction.

ACI strengthens member companies by advocating on their behalf, providing timely and useful education on critical topics and enabling members to work together on integrated and collaborative teams that deliver excellent projects. The Charitable Doll House Project advances those core principles.

Skeptics say, “Doll houses? Please. BIM and IPD only work on large projects.”  Wrong.  BIM and IPD work on both large and small projects.  In fact, the Charitable Doll House Project offers stakeholders opportunities to explore the use of BIM and IPD tools and processes in low cost, low risk environments.  Integrated teams, formed and mentored by BIM and IPD enabled professionals, will build virtual and physical doll houses and sell those doll houses at the Spirit of Construction’s Silent Auction in October, 2015. Participants will learn valuable skills, while raising money for their favorite charity. 

The Charitable Doll House Project launches in February via a series of interactive workshops and collaborative team building exercises led by Collaborative Construction and Benjamin, Yocum & Heather, LLC.

The Charitable Doll House Project offers ACI members an opportunity to create a new generation plan room while testing game changing tools and processes as collaborative members of cross disciplinary BIM and IPD enabled teams. While ACI and its partners facilitate formation of teams, relevant training, and access to critical tools, processes and expertise, integrated teams need only bring enthusiasm and a willingness to think outside the box!

ACI members interested in forming or joining a team should contact Linda Bach at ACI for a seat at a kick off session in February, 2015. 



Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Saturday, December 20, 2014

Workshop in San Diego




As mentioned in an earlier post I'll be presenting in San Diego in January at the 5th Annual CPM Conference. I wanted to reach out to a wider audience regarding the trip to determine whether there are any companies in the area interested in hosting a low cost collaborative workshop while I am in town.  Workshop can be tailored to meet the needs of the host and attendees so let me know what you need.  

I arrive in San Diego on the morning of Friday, January 16, 2015 and I'm presenting in the afternoon on Saturday, January 17. Thus I'm free Friday afternoon or Saturday morning.  On the outside chance any of you are attending the NAHB International Builders Show in Las Vegas, I'll presenting on the topic ofForensic BIM to the Architectural Subcommittee at that event on January 20, 2015.

Anyone interested parties should shoot me an email.

Meanwhile, I hope you all have a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website