Tuesday, October 27, 2009

New Generation CCIP

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Integrated team members should consider implementing a CCIP on their next integrated project. And by CCIP I do not mean a constructor controlled insurance program but rather a collaboratively controlled insurance program.

For all the myriad of reasons a constructor controlled insurance program make sense, a collaboratively controlled insurance program makes even more sense.

By involving the insurance agency, the carriers, the owner, the constructor, and all specialty sub-contractors and consultants and designers in the process of risk mitigation and risk management from the outset integrated team members will be able to control and manage risk on major commercial projects more efficiently and more effectively through a collaboratively controlled insurance program.

Collaborative Construction has created a draft version of a collaboratively controlled insurance program for integrated teams. Owners, contractors and design professionals interested in utilizing BIM and Lean Construction and Design processes to deliver construction and design services more efficiently should seriously consider using a Collaboratively Controlled Insurance Program.

The new generation of integrated business processes work best when developed and deployed under an integrated legal framework, and insurance processes and business choices are no different. Collaborative Construction has specialized experience with the legal instruments that support and enable BIM and Lean design and construction, and we would like to help integrated teams craft a CCIP that will work with those instruments.

Anyone interested in drafting an integrated agreement, a collaboratively controlled insurance program, a collaborative logistics and supply chain addendum, a BIM implementation plan, a lean process implementation plan or any other new and innovative business processes that enhances the efficiency with which construction, design, maintenance and operations are delivered on a complex project should contact Collaborative Construction.

James L. Salmon
Of Counsel
Beatty Bangle Strama, p.c.
400 West 15th Street Suite 1450
Austin, Texas 78701
(o) 512-879-5050
(f) 512-879-5040
(c) 512-630-4446
(s) 859-912-7747

President
Collaborative Construction Resources, LLC

Jsalmon@bbsfirm.com
JamesLsalmon@gmail.com
James.Salmon@collaborativeCR.com
www.CollaborativeConstruction.Blogspot.com
www.CollaborativeConstruction.com
www.bbsfirm.com

Office: 512-879-5050
Skype No: 859-912-7747
Cell No: 512-630-4446
Skype: JameswithCCR

Owner's Project Requirements


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Every project should begin with a thorough analysis of the "Owner's Project Requirements" and such a document should be completed as early in the planning and design process as possible. Such a document will convey what needs to be accomplished to the integrated team, and will focus the Owner's attention on critical elements of the project.

Other benefits include 1) measurable criteria for success 2) owner approved project requirements and guidelines and 3) clarification of programming and design efforts.

Owners and other integrated team members interested in learning more about the benefits of an Owners Project Requirements manual should contact Carol Warkoczewski with Synergy Builders at www.synergybuilders.com 512-263-5521.

Synergy Builders is owned by Carol Warkoczewski who is also the founder of the LinkedIn based Leadership in Capital Projects Forum which recently hosted an excellent IPD workshop in Dallas and will be hosting another one in Austin in February.


James L. Salmon
Of Counsel
Beatty Bangle Strama, p.c.
400 West 15th Street Suite 1450
Austin, Texas 78701
(o) 512-879-5050
(f) 512-879-5040
(c) 512-630-4446
(s) 859-912-7747

President
Collaborative Construction Resources, LLC

Jsalmon@bbsfirm.com
JamesLsalmon@gmail.com
James.Salmon@collaborativeCR.com
www.CollaborativeConstruction.Blogspot.com
www.CollaborativeConstruction.com
www.bbsfirm.com

Office: 512-879-5050
Skype No: 859-912-7747
Cell No: 512-630-4446
Skype: JameswithCCR

Monday, October 26, 2009

Where As Built BIM Models are headed

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

The kind of advances described in the article linked below in Technology Review's on-line magazine will become a reality sooner rather than later. And construction and design industry professionals need to start paying closer attention to these kinds of advances.

"In the not-too-distant future, it might be possible to slip on a pair of augmented-reality (AR) goggles instead of fumbling with a manual while trying to repair a car engine. Instructions overlaid on the real world would show how to complete a task by identifying, for example, exactly where the ignition coil was, and how to wire it up correctly."

Read the whole thing!


Email: JamesLSalmon@Gmail.com
Phone: 512-879-5050
Cell: 512-630-4446
Skype: 859-912-7747
Skype Name: JameswithCCR
Web: CollaborativeConstruction.com
Blog: CollaborativeConstruction.BlogSpot.com

Networking: CollaborativeBIMadvocates.com

Thursday, October 1, 2009

Benefits of Collaborative Construction (Adaptation)

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

This post is adapted from a comment I posted on a LinkedIn discussion.

Integrated or Collaborative Agreements, i.e. the one's required to achieve IPD, cannot be drafted in a vacuum and cannot be executed by parties who do not trust one another. That is a key difference between an Integrated or Collaborative Agreement and a traditional or transactional agreement.

Integrated or Collaborative Agreements ARISE out of trusted business relationships. Crafting, drafting, negotiating and ultimately executing an Integrated or Collaborative Agreement is a process - and a rather involved one at that - that cannot be successful unless the parties at the negotiating table trust one another. Building trust among business partners is a very difficult thing, especially in the construction industry where mistrust and mis-communication are the norm.

By contrast, traditional transactional agreement CREATE legal relationships with the stroke of a pen. The parties to a traditional agreement need not have any relationship with one another, and, in fact, parties to such agreements are often total strangers. Those agreements are crafted with an eye towards how the parties relationship should be adjusted when one or the other breaches the agreement, rather than with an eye on the question of how the parties can collaborate and achieve win-win solutions to the inevitable problems that arise.

I tell my clients that Collaborative and Integrated Agreements are NOT for everyone and you should only enter into a Collaborative or Integrated Agreement if you - and the other parties - are willing to invest the time and energy necessary to build the level of trust required to achieve success. Unfortunately, as Carol points out, a bad apple can spoil the whole process.

Further, the Integrated and Collaborative, i.e. "trusting" nature of the relationship between the owner, contractor and designer - in perfect IPD world - does not necessarily extend to the subcontractors, consultants, suppliers and others involved in the project. Accordingly, the benefits associated with an Integrated or Collaborative Agreement may not always manifest themselves until the Collaborative Spirit of the process is handed off to others.

The key, in my experience, is to engage as many of the key stakeholders in the processes as possible - and as early as possible - and to let those key stakeholders begin building "trust" among themselves via OPEN AND HONEST communications about what they expect from the project, what their interests are, what their concerns are, etc. etc. In addition, it helps to have all the key stakeholders put real skin in the game in exchange for a shoot at real and quantifiable economic rewards. One easy way to do that in the early stages of an IPD project is for all the key stakeholders to share the cost of crafting, drafting, negotiating and ultimately executing an Integrated or Collaborative Agreement.

That process, which should be filled with open and BRUTALLY honest communication can forge - or destroy - trust more quickly that any series of Kumbaya Sessions. If the parties forge strong trusting relationships then the IPD project will likely be a great success. If, on the other hand, the parties find they cannot trust one another they should go there separate ways.

Again, sharing the cost of crafting, drafting, negotiating and ultimately executing an Integrated or Collaborative Agreement is the best way to approach the process, as it depends on OPEN AND HONEST communication to build TRUST among the key stakeholders.


Email: James.Salmon@CollaborativeCR.com
Phone: 512-879-5050
Cell: 859-912-7747
Skype: JameswithCCR
Web: CollaborativeConstruction.com
Blog: CollaborativeConstruction.BlogSpot.com

Networking: CollaborativeBIMadvocates.com

Benefits of Colllaborative Construction

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Benefits of Collaborative Construction

Sweeping changes are taking place in the construction industry, mainly to combat the slump that the real estate sector has been going through recently. Among the few measures that are tasting success is collaborative construction, where people can buy a stake in a building that is under construction. So a condo or any other construction could have owners even before it is completely built, with tenants, suppliers of materials and others in the supply chain entitled to ownership before completion of the project. The advantages of collaborative construction are:

· If tenants buy a stake in apartment buildings or condominium complexes, they get to almost customize their space; they could choose the kind of flooring they want, the color of the paint to be used, and the fixtures and furnishings that make a house a home.

· Incentives are usually provided to those who choose to pre-book their units, either in the form of cash benefits or in the form of a free hand in designing their living space.

· Tenants feel a greater sense of ownership because it is almost like building their own home, the only difference being that they don’t have to worry about all the hassles that are associated with the construction process.

· Developers are able to gain a better understanding of consumer demand and trends in consumer taste.

· They also gain because upfront payments from clients help ease the initial financial burden. Also, when units in an apartment or condo perceived to be in demand, it brings in more prospective and definite tenants, all of which work out well for the developer.

· There is a lower probability of projects being left unfinished because funds and tenants are not a problem.

· For tenants, there is the advantage of being able to move in faster because their apartment or condo comes customized to their demands and needs. They don’t have to take the time to personalize their living space.

On the downside, collaborative construction may take a little longer than traditional construction, but the benefits by far outweigh the drawbacks.

By-line:

This guest article was written by Adrienne Carlson, who regularly writes on the topic of construction management degrees . Adrienne welcomes your comments and questions at her email address: adrienne.carlson83@yahoo.com


Email: James.Salmon@CollaborativeCR.com
Phone: 859-441-6033
Cell: 859-912-7747
Skype: JameswithCCR
Web: CollaborativeConstruction.com
Blog: CollaborativeConstruction.BlogSpot.com

Networking: CollaborativeBIMadvocates.com