Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Shale Oil Project in Utah

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

TomCo Energy out of the UK has taken the first step in developing oil leases they hold in the massive Uintah Shale formation in Utah.  TomCo's approach is as environmentally friendly as a fossil fuel production plan can be.  The EcoShaleTM process they have developed purports to produce oil from tight shale formations, like the Uintah, with NO WATER which is a big deal in Utah.  A series of contracts have been signed with a variety of engineering and consulting firms involving the environmental assess required to move forward.

Stephen Komlosy, CEO of TomCo Energy, comments: "We are delighted to have engaged the services of Rocky Mountain Power, Epic Engineering and Norwest Corporation as consultancy partners in our Holliday Block development project, and we expect to see some real progress over the next several months. These are all companies with enormous experience in the Uintah Basin, and in the challenges presented by oil shale projects, and the projects being initiated are all necessary for the upgrading of project Resources to Reserves as we move towards development of our Holliday Block asset."

The Uintah Shale formation is estimated to contain on the order of 1.3 trillion cubic barrels of oil, with 800 billion of those thought to be recoverable through current technology.  To put those numbers in perspective, the Saudis are sitting on proven reserves of only 267 billion barrels of oil, or 1/5th of the world's proven reserves.  If TomCo can extract this oil in an environmentally responsible manner the positive impact on the US economy will be enormous.  Collaborative Construction will be keeping a close eye on TomCo's efforts.

Link to Article
 
James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Monday, August 22, 2011

Techonology and Investors


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

I found the article linked below interesting.  The quoted language is, I think, of interest to those of us in the construction industry interested in IPD, BIM and lean business processes.

Stated simply, we can already find, access, and share so much information that we are drowning.  The next wave of developments are likely to emphasize filtering and analysis—helping us get the information we either want or need (not always the same thing), and then make sense of that information.  Specialized search, analytics, and interfaces capable of making complex scientific derivations accessible to the average consumer, are likely to become prominent.  We may be leaving an extended period of increased information access and entering an era of enhanced information access.

Google and HP Hammered for Aquisitions



James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Thursday, August 18, 2011

IBM's New "Brain Chip" Mimics the Human Mind


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!


Can the deep thinkers please step to the front of the class and tell us what this means for IPD, BIM and lean business processes?

IBM's New Chip Mimics the Brain

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Monday, August 15, 2011

IPD Round Table on ROI for General Contractors


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

The IPD Round Table presentation on August 25, 2011 will focus on the ROI for IPD, BIM and lean processes for General Contractors. Short definitions of BIM, IPD and Lean will be set forth, the best legal mechanism for achieving IPD, BIM and Lean will be identified – an integrated agreement – and we will then turn our attention to the ROI achieved by General Contractors in the US who have adopted all or some aspects of IPD, BIM and the lean construction processes like the Last Planner System, Integrated Supply Chain Management and similar tools.

Collaborative Construction defines ROI as ROIx where the return on investment in innovation & information is multiplied to the X power by leveraging modern technology and lean business processes. Some of the questions we will explore include:

What is the ROIx of an investment in BIM?

What is the ROIx of an investment in IPD?

What is the ROIx of an investment in lean construction processes?

Where can the ROIx be found?

How do you measure ROIx?

Who gets the $ generated by ROIx?

Who gets the knowledge associated with ROIx?

Who gets the functional digital asset ROIx produces?

The ROI (Return on Investment) in BIM manifested by clash detection is old hat.

ROIx is a totally different ballgame as investing in innovation AND information AND leveraging that investment over the web has the potential to exponentially expand the value of the investment.

Adopting BIM – and the innovative lean business processes that must accompany it - is an investment in innovation required to compete in the 21st Century. Early adopters are reaping huge benefits. Adoption requires changes in corporate culture and, ultimately, a revolution in the built industry around the globe. Currently, too few entities in the built industry in Ireland are paying attention to the looming Tsunami of change bearing down on them. Focusing on these processes while the economy is slow will pay huge dividents when the economy comes back. The one (1) hour Webinar scheduled for Thursday August 25, 2011 at 9:30 a.m. EST.
Below are instructions for joining.

1. Go to this LINK 


2. If requested, enter your name and email address.

3. If a password is required, enter the meeting password: ipdrountable

4. Click "Join".

5. Follow the instructions that appear on your screen.


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Wyoming Federal District Court Rejects Obama Administration Drilling Rules


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

I haven't had a chance to read the decision but if MSNBC is reporting the ruling in a positive light it's probably pretty good.  The Obama Administration has bent over backwards to accomodate environmental concerns and the BLM, under hte new rules crafted by the Obama Administration's Secretary of Interior Ken Salazar, was denying a lot of permits. 

A more fundamental questions arises in my mind and that is to what extent and under what authority the federal government continues to control vast swaths ot land in western states.  I suspect this was the "deal" that was struck back in the day for admission to the Union but I'm not sure how long residents in western states are going to stand by as the federal government deprives them of access to their resources.  This ruling appears to be a step in the right direction.

You can read more at the link below.

Interior Rules Rejected
James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Friday, August 12, 2011

Oil Sands in Alberta - Part III


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

I didn't realize this was a III part series.  Here's the final installment.

Good stuff.

Alberta Oil Sands - Part  III

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Mining Oil Sands - Part II

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Below is a link to the second in a a two part series on producing oil from the oil sands in Alberta.  Energy companies seem to be paying a lot more attention to reclamation and other efforts to protect the environment today.  Watch the second video in the embedded report for a good overview of the use of steam to extract the oil.

I'm also interested in the use of natural gas to dilute the oil which might be a better option in drier climates.  Initially, I was worried about excess use of water, but it appears these companies are doing a great job of keeping the water they use to minimum by recycling the water used in the steam loop from one cycle to the next.

The report alludes to the boom to bust cycle associated with these production efforts and I see a lot of opportunity fo the use of IPD, BIM and lean processes by the companies involved.  Of course, most of these big energy companies already have a preffered set of service providers, but the surrounding communites, I think, are the ones that could benefit from collaborative solutions provided by intergrated teams.

Oil Sands Production Part II


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Mining Oil Sands in Alberta Canada


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

The story linked below provides a more in depth explantation of the process for extracting oil sands located close enough to the surface to allow removal of the overburden.  The reclamation effort, described in the article and an accompanying video, is impressive. 

Ignoring vast reserves of oil and natural gas in North America seems rather impurdent.  "Ethical Oil", i.e. oil produced by our friends and not our enemies, is the kind of oil we should consume.  Collaborative Construction will continue to highlight stories detailing ongoing efforts to access and produce these resources.

Mining Alberta Oil Sands

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Friday, August 5, 2011

Rare Earth Metal Boom in Nebraska?


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!


The article linked below, in the Washington Times, highlights the emerging boom related to a rare earth metals find in a small town in Nebraska.  As readers may recall, from the seabed article on rare earth metals post a few weeks ago the Chinese have us by the short hairs when it comes to rare earth metals.

The U.S. has relied on China for years for the 17 minerals that are defined as rare earths by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. Despite having such obscure names as praseodymium, promethium and samarium - no copper or zinc here - they are necessary for such routine contemporary technologies as magnets, laser pointers and miniature electronics, such as iPods.

This local communties affected by this boom, like those affected by the the shale gas plays Collaborative Construction has been posting about here, need to considere an planned and intergrated approach to the economic development coming their way.

Rare Earth Metals in Nebraska

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Oil Sands Production Costs to Drop?


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Canada, and many parts of the western United States, have vast reserves of oil trapped in so-called "oil sands" and it has, historically, been too expensive to extract the oil from the oil sands.  Oil trapped in oil sands is too thick to flow easily and it must be refined before it will flow through a pipeline.  Much of Candada's oil sands are accessed and refined - through heating the oil - at the surface.

Drilling for oil in an oil sand formation is difficult because the oil has to be heated downhole before it will flow.  Until recently, steam was injected downhole to heat the oil and cause it to flow.  The article linked below describes a new process that involves the use - and re-use - of propane as a solvent cabable of reducing the viscosity of the oil in the oil sands, enabling production without steam.

The article also highlights the value of horizontal drilling techniques in the process.

Because the new process requires less energy, it should also be cheaper. Smith adds that the equipment needed for heating and reusing the propane is less expensive than technology for managing the large volumes of water used in the steam process. With conventional techniques, oil prices have to be above $50 to $60 per barrel—as they have been for several years—for oil sands to be economical. Smith says that with the solvent process, oil sands are still economical even if oil is $30 to $40 per barrel, close to what it was in the 1990s and early 2000s (in inflation-adjusted dollars). N-Solv says the lower costs will make it possible to economically extract more than twice as much oil from the oil sands compared to conventional technologies.

Read the whole thing


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Monday, August 1, 2011

Flipping the Classroom - Is the Khan Academy Revolutionizing Teaching?

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

Below I'm linking to another great TED video.  This is a presentation by Salman Khan, founder of the Khan Academy.  In the video he presents the concept of "flipping the classroom", the idea of recording lectures on the web and then teaching homework in the class room.  At Collaborative Construction we are exploring the use of this technique in our collaborative workshops.  If collaborative workshop attendees will invest time and energy in viewing lectures in advance then we can work on "homework" during the actual collaborative workshops.

I encourage all readers to take the time to view the video and a think about ways to extend these concepts in your business.  Please think about forwarding a link to this blog post to colleagues you think might be interested in the concept.


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International