Sunday, October 23, 2011

Architects trained to be crazy?



Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!


That would explain a lot wouldn't it!  lol.  I keed.  I keed my architect friends.

Architecture school invests several years conditioning the student to respond preferentially to abstract industrial forms and surfaces. At the same time, this industrial aesthetic is touted as superior to all previous, traditional expressions of built geometry. Elaborate theories of history and technology are given as apologias for this now-correct aesthetic, solely appropriate to this wholly unique climax period in history (Banham, 1960; Giedion, 1941; Gropius, 1965). All of this effort creates individuals that see things differently from the rest of us.


This long-term program of psychological conditioning, has, since its development in the original Bauhaus, turned out to be extraordinarily effective. An architect experiences the world in a very different manner to any person who has not undergone the same training. By internalizing preferences derived from abstract images that override our neurological structure, over time, responses become automatic and crowd out other, more innate responses. The result of this aesthetic hegemony is the phenomenon of “architectural myopia,” an interpretation of reality that conforms to ingrained beliefs.

Read the whole thing

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Wednesday, October 19, 2011

Green on green violence shutters windmills at night



Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

The story linked below highlights one of the enduring conundrums faced by advocates of renewable energy.  Renewable energy production kills endangered species just as dead as production of energy from fossil fuels does.  Shutting down renewable energy production hardly seems to advance the cause.

With windfarms killing protected bats and birds, hydroelectic facilities depriving endangered fish and other species of habitat and solar farms wiping out vast swaths of desert habitat its looking more and more like we need to take another long hard look at developing fossil fuels more responsibly.

Until renewable energy technologies mature no one interested in sustainable design and development is going to be well served.  Market based renewable energy solutions, which would be more viable in a deregulated utility industry, make sense.  Having the federal government pick winners and losers based on the amount money bundled for campaing contributions does not. 

Read the whole thing  


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Utica Shale bigger than Marcellus?

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

I had a long conversation a couple of months ago with the president of the Ohio Natural Gas Association and he mentioned that the Utica was going to come in bigger than Marcellus.  It looks like he was right.

According to an estimate from Ohio state geologists, that state's portion of the Utica alone could contain up to 15 trillion cubic feet of natural gas, which would make it a significant contributor to national supplies of the fuel that will help cut greenhouse gas emissions and create thousands of jobs.
But the Utica is distinguished by also harboring natural gas liquids and large quantities of oil which have sparked a rush by energy companies to acquire leases on millions of acres of land, especially in eastern Ohio.



The Ohio geologists calculate there could be as many as 5.5 billion barrels of recoverable oil underlying their state's share of the Utica, or about a third of the expected production from Alaska's Prudhoe Bay, the largest US oil reserve.

Read the whole thing here.
 
Let those numbers sink in for a minute.  15 TRILLION cubic feet of gas in Ohio ALONE and another 5.5 BILLION barrels of recoverable oil in Ohio ALONE. 

Ding ding ding.  Can you say economic winner?  What pray tell is taking place in North Dakota and western PA at this very moment?

Ultimately, we must wean ourselves off petroleum and move to an economy powered by renewable forms of engery.  But misguided attempts to force that result while renewables are not ready for prime time have proven disasterous.  Its time to develop the energy resources we have in our own back yard.  Cheap, abundant and reliable energy will fuel an economic recovery of immense proportions.  It's time to develope these resources.


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International

Thursday, October 6, 2011

Coal to Liquid Fuel Story

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

My impression is that the gas to liquid process utilized by Shell's Pearl Plant in Qatar is more efficient and more environmentally friendly that the coal to liquid process pioneered by Nazi Germany during WWII but the article linked below indicates a company in Wyoming is producing diesel fuel from coal at a cost that is competitive with oil at $60 per barrel.  That number is, I think, very similar to the gas to liquid cost discussed in prior posts here.

Ultimately, cheaper more abundent and more reliable engery will be the best medicine for our economy.  I've grown more and more skeptical over the last year of the need to "decarbonize" our economy.  We certainly need to protect our environment but I don't see the benefit of throwing the baby out with the bathwater as many of my green friends seem intent on doing.

Not sure how new the ideas discussed in the article are but it does discuss another use for coal which is widely available in the US.

Read the whole thing


James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom
Collaborative Construction Website
Sustainable Land Development International