Saturday, July 20, 2013

Initial Podcast Style Post




In late May Lauren Browne interviewed me for an article she wrote for Connect Press.  A copy of the article is linked below.  At the time I recorded the interview via Skype, but Lauren's questions were not recorded.  I finally modified the audio and inserted Lauren's questions.

The audio file is linked below.  Let me know what you think of the audio format.  I might post more audio files if I can figure out how to use Audacity efficiently.

Below is a link to Lauren Browne's article:

Cloud Computing:  Changing Collaboration's Digital Infrastructure.


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
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3 comments:

Brian O' Hanlon said...

James,

Hansel minutes podcasts are fairly good to listen to. There is about 500 I think, or so, going back quite a number of years now. On different topics. But some you might find interesting. It's on iTunes too, but only the most recently dozen or so. You can get olders ones though on hanselminutes dot com.

Also, I had a check back on the full hour interview with Larry Ellison this evening, from D10 last year - to recall again, some of the points that he made.
http://allthingsd.com/video/?video_id=BA19BA11-0CFC-4319-8537-7BFCC58214F8

His point about 'consumer' devices overtaking enterprise equipment for the first time, is a point that I hadn't caught the first time around I listened to the interview. But listening to Ellison's interview, is a pretty good way to find a 'context' in which to interpret more up-to-the-minute articles from 'allthingsd', and other sources, like this one.

Big Data Is the Only Way to Compete With Google
http://allthingsd.com/20130718/big-data-is-the-only-way-to-compete-with-google/?refcat=media

I would compare it a little, to silicon a number of years back, where Intel had all of the 'capacity' to produce wafers, and everyone had to try and manage against the giant competitor as best they could. It led to a trend, where some companies started to move away from the foundry management aspect of the business, and just to compete on design etc instead.

In the same way, one sees a few very large competitors in the internet today, and the question is, how does one match their kind of 'fire power'. It's the same idea kind of, that one outsources the responsibility for providing all of the huge infrastructure down the line, and one gets busy using the platform that someone else can provide to run one's applications on.

Amado said...

This is cool!

Brian O' Hanlon said...

James,

You can hear Cowhey and Kleeman talk about their recent paper on cloud computing from the San Diego Super computing centre here. I think there is quite a bit of stuff in the panel talk that you would find of value.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9BoXfCb2O6g