Monday, December 16, 2013

(BIM)X Googlizes Knowledge




Below is an excerpt from my lecture on how (BIM)X is Googlizing Knowledge in the built industry.  I spent time over the last two weeks refining the lecture and creating the accompanying power point presentation.  During that time a couple of interesting blog posts cam across my radar.

First, Laura Handler, Tocci Construction -n-house BIM Whiz and the proprietor of the (bim)x Blog , posted an insightful query upon her return from CITA's highly successful BIM Gathering in Dublin, Ireland asking what needs to change in the built industry, content or delivery?  Apparently, at the BIM Gathering  a number of academics raised the very question. Laura asked on her (bim)x Blog, “Content or Delivery: What needs to change in AEC education?” The question of how we learn was further highlighted when Randy Deutsch a scholarly leader in the field of BIM and IPD authored a blog post, “Why My BIM Book Didn't Sell and Why I'm Writing Another One.” Similar questions were posed by participants in an Academic Panel at the BIM Day Out in Australia.

The questions of how to teach BIM and IPD to the industry has taken center stage. It seized the spotlight at the BIM Gathering in Ireland. It was the focus of an hour long discussion at the BIM Day Out in Australia. Academics throughout the US and Canada are asking the same question. Middlesex University out of London has hired me to help deliver knowledge related to the cultural and legal implications of BIM. The UK Government authored a 60+ page set of BIM education guidelines. Penn State, Stanford and Georgia Tech, among other universities in the US, offer BIM and IPD related courses and materials.

The Smart Built Culture Series intends to tackle this issue in a collaborative manner. The goal is to deliver a unique online learning experience on a global scale and to supplement the virtual events with live workshops where we delve into the nuts and bolts of BIM and IPD. Collaborative Construction is negotiating with key stakeholders from all over the world. Dublin, London, Suttgart, New York, Miami, Atlanta, Cincinnati, Chicago, Toronto, Kansas City, Dallas, Austin, Houston, Phoenix, Denver, Calgary, Edmonton, Vancouver, Sydney, Melbourne and Perth are all under consideration as potential sites for live workshops. Joining forces with Global e Training and universities around the world, as well as BIM and IPD champions throughout the built industry there's no reason we cannot solve this problem. Let's come together and get this done!

(BIM)X Googlizes Knowledge Lecture - Excerpt

Knowledge in the built industry

This lecture tackles knowledge in the built industry. Titled, “(BIM)X Googlizes Knowledge”, the lecture explores what passes for knowledge in the built industry, why knowledge matters in the built industry, and how we acquire, share and preserve knowledge in the built environment.

Knowledge, as defined in the lecture and in these lecture notes is the acquisition of information, understanding and or skill through experience and or education.

The purposeful use of the disjunctive, along side the conjunctive, highlights the varied nature of knowledge. Philosophy exists, in large part, to debate the scope and nature of knowledge. In this post and the lecture I grant the varied nature of knowledge and focus more on the what, why and how of knowledge.

To that end, the critical questions in the built industry include; What knowledge matters? Why does that knowledge matter? And how do we use that knowledge?

The knowledge that matters

Stated differently, the first knowledge question in the built industry is what information matters? What understandings matter? And what skills matter? True knowledge of critical information in the built industry entails a mastery of these three components. Knowing what information you need, understanding that information and possessing the skills required to leverage that information in a way that adds value to the project.

For example, the legal description of a parcel contains critical information. As a lawyer, I understand that information and possess the skills and training necessary to craft a series of legal instruments that depend on that information. Deeds, liens, and mortgage agreements each require that information and accurate deeds, liens and or mortgage agreements effect the value of the parcel. Separately, the civil engineer, the surveyor and the excavation contractor each bring skills to the table that enable them to leverage the information contained in the legal description.

Why that knowledge matters

Knowledge of the legal description of the property matters because you don't want to build on the wrong parcel. You want to place the sewer and storm water drainage systems in the correct place and you don't want to dig the foundation in the wrong place. If we fail to accurately locate the parcel then many things can go wrong. Thus knowledge of the legal description matters because it represents foundational information, is critical to understanding where the parcel is located and will be relied on by professionals with an array of skills to add to and or effect the value of the parcel.

How we use that knowledge

As noted, an array of built industry professionals leverage knowledge created by acquiring information, understanding that information and, ultimately, applying specialized skills that convert knowledge of that information into value. Converting knowledge to value represents a core component of the emerging knowledge economy. The built industry needs to leverage, enhance and adapt existing skills in ways that add value in the built environment as a whole. Winners in the new knowledge economy will learn to do this. Losers will fail. Be a winner.

Conclusion

Built industry professionals need to know what BIM is, why it is important and how to leverage it. The same goes for IPD. Existing mechanisms for delivering knowledge to built industry professionals don't appear to be working. And whether those mechanisms will work in the new knowledge economy remains an open question too.



Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs Nails It!; Work Smart AND Hard!




The built industry needs to get behind this guy!  He understands the looming labor shortage in the industry and works hard to bring that message to young people.  The Collaborative Construction Blog has been a supporter of Mike Rowe's Trades Hub for a couple of years now.  Just look to your left and you will see Mike in a yellow hard hat.  Follow the link and think about how you and your organization can help. 

Below is an embedded copy of a great interview with Mike Rowe.  He points out that there are no scholarships available to kids with a great work ethic.

Watch the whole thing.


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Friday, December 6, 2013

(BIM)X Googlizes Everything in the Knowledge Economy




That's the title of the lecture to the students in the BIM Strategy / Management Course offered by Middlesex University out of London.  As regular readers may know, I'm teaching the cultural and legal implications of BIM and IPD piece of the course online and the entire course if being folded into the Smart Built Culture Series scheduled for launch in 2014 and the Smart Built Cultures:  Fixing Our Broke Built Culture book scheduled completion in late 2014 and publication in 2015.  Individuals and entities interested in participating - either passively or actively - need to reach out right away.  The train is leaving the station!

But on to the subject of this post.  Access to the vast reservoir of data on the web represents a sea change in history.  For the first time, virtually every individual on the planet enjoys access to information - and by extension knowledge - mastered by every other individual on the planet.  The exponential connections required to connect any two such individuals on the planet blow one's mind.  But critically, the vast reservoir - should we actually call it a universe? - of data expands exponentially everyday as we move from a web / iCloud where humans physically input data to an internet of things where (SMART)X objects feed information to the web 24/7/365.

Think about that for a minute.  The exponential explosion of data / information that began when Guttenberg invented the printing press got real when Al Gore invented the interwebs back in 1991!  

Where does the built industry fit?

Not sure yet.  The built industry drags its feet, whines and refuses to embrace change.  Some does so because the ball of fat they manage is just too lucrative.  Others do so because they don't see the looming Tsunami.  Still others refuse due to comfort with their current circumstances.  But change looms.  And individuals and entities the deliver services in the built industry cannot avoid change forever.

But fit the industry must.  The web and the global economy punishes laggards.  Top end design and construction firms deploy BIM now.  They also keep a finger on the pulse of IPD from their clients' the owners' - perspective.  As owners demand BIM and IPD these firms deliver BIM and IPD.  Can you?

Let's change gears and take a look at a new firm delivering manufacturing design and production services in the new knowledge economy.

Three years ago the company consisted of Jordi hand-soldering on a folding card table in his garage and me and my kids packing kits on the dining room table. Now we've got 35,000 square feet of factory space with four high-end pick-and-place lines, three CNC lines, and factory managers hired from companies such as Samsung and Foxconn running the show. All of this was learned by doing, not by schooling. And that's the magic of the new industrial revolution. 

Read more: How the Innovation Economy is Turning Makers Into Manufacturers - Popular Mechanics
Follow us: @PopMech on Twitter | popularmechanics on Facebook
Visit us at PopularMechanics.com

Click the links above to read the whole thing.  This article nicely summarizes the impact of the knowledge economy on the manufacturing industry.  As usual, the three big auto markers will be caught flat footed.  Will you?  Will your firm?

There's no excuse.  The Smart Built Culture Series addresses these issues and arms you individually and your firm as an organization with the tools you need to compete in the new knowledge economy.  Reach out today and get involved.  Don't be swept away by a tsunami in the new knowledge economy.


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Thursday, December 5, 2013

Educating the Fracking Idiots in Hollywood




The Western Energy Alliance has nice video out rebutting the drivel about fracking spewed by the Fracking Idiots in Hollywood.  You can watch the video below but I encourage you to click the link above to and visit the WEA site and quickly review the debunking of fracking myths there.  

Again, as I noted yesterday in the piece on Oil & Gas driving our economy cheap affordable energy extracted and sold by entrepreneurs raises more poor people out of poverty than almost any other process on the planet.  


Again, visit the Western Energy Alliance website and review the list of debunked myths spread by the Fracking Idiots in Hollywood. 

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Shale Oil & Gas - The Economic Engine Driving America




Outside the insular confines of our Hunger Games style Capital in Washington D.C. - where the slow motion train wreck of the launch of the Orwellian named Affordable Care Act takes center stage - an amazingly nimble and resilient economy continues to grow slowly.  But how?

Following the financial crisis in 2008 we flushed a trillion dollars in stimulus money through the bowels of the federal Goose government - earmarked for "shovel ready projects" that weren't so shovel ready after all - threw billions more into the cavernous maws of the Big Pigs Banks and doled out billions more to green Weasels Obama Campaign donors like Solyndra, Fisker and others.  And what comes out the back end of a Goose, a Pig or a Weasel?

That's right, and we spread it all over the country and waited for the green sprouts to grow.  Sadly, none of the manure produced by the federal government's over-priced stimulus programs grew squat.  So, again, what accounts for what little growth we do see in the economy?

Oil and gas extracted from tight shale formations all over the country.

That's it in a nutshell.
The smart-drilling shale ecosystem now contributes some $400 billion a year to the U.S. economy according to economists at Purdue University. Over the past five years alone this sector has also attracted over $200 billion in foreign direct investment into America according to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). For context, two percent GDP growth adds $330 billion a year to the U.S. economy. Now do the math. Shale technology has kept America out of a recession. It has also indirectly and directly “created or preserved” -- to borrow a political phrase -- millions of jobs. 
American workers are building infrastructure for the hydrocarbon extraction, transportation and processing industries. They are erecting new steel mills for underground pipes, manufacturing thousands of new rail cars and constructing 80 major pipeline projects right now (not counting the Keystone XL from Canada.) Refineries are being expanded everywhere. Even shipyards are booming with over two dozen supertankers being built right here in the U.S. All of this is genuinely “shovel ready” and subsidy-free. 
And there’s more. A renaissance in America’s energy-intensive manufacturing from plastics to fertilizers is underway. In a remarkably little-noted report this past summer the American Chemical Council catalogued 100 chemical industry investments valued at over $70 billion coming on-line by 2017 that will create over one million jobs and add over $300 billion annually to the GDP.
Nothing frees the poor from the shackles of poverty like cheap energy.  And nothing shackles them more tightly to poverty than government entitlement programs.  Like *cough* Obamacare.

So.... read the whole thing and

Drill Baby Drill!

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Tuesday, December 3, 2013

Doll Houses, Tree Houses and Habitat for Humanity




The title of this blog post hints at what's on the horizon for the Smart Built Culture Series.  As the series gains momentum - negotiations are under way with partners in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia - readers need to spread the word.  The scope and nature of the live workshop projects contemplated for the series in 2014 blow the doors off prior projects.  Think live integrated team formation, innovative collaboration and lessons learned.

Stay tuned for further details but the series, the workshops that accompany the series and Collaborative Construction's unique cadre of partners promise a global learning experience like no other.

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website