Thursday, April 24, 2014

Vicarious Success - Are you a Vicar?




This blog post borrows from the Five Laws of Stratospheric Success set forth in the form of a parable in The Go-Giver by Bob Burg and John David Mann. And Regular readers know what a sucker I am for a good parable.  For proof look no further than Katy's Castle and my most recent post Of Scorpions and Frogs. Accordingly, readers will find it unsurprising that I read The Go-Giver the same day I received it from my friend Jennifer Lanzetti at Cn3D Construction and put it in the mail to another contact the same afternoon I received the book from Jennifer.

But not before I converted the key lessons into an easy to remember acronym, VICAR.  And that's what gives rise to this blog post.

The Five Laws of Stratospheric Success set forth in The Go-Giver lay out a great path to success.  Below, I've re-order those rules to fit around the acronym VICAR, and added a twist.

After reordering the laws I also renamed them.  My name for the Five Laws of Stratospheric Success is the Rules for Vicarious Success.  The root word in that new description is  the term VICAR.  A Vicar, pronounced "Viker" with a short i, not a long i, was, originally, the “Agent of the Church” in England. Embedding the Five laws of Stratospheric Success in the term "VICAR" flips traditional notions of "vicarious liability" on their head.  

Under the law an employer or principal can be liable for the negligence of the employer / principal's agent and or agents. When the law holds an employer or a principal liable for the actions an employee or an agent we call the vicarious liability.   Accordingly, the term “vicarious” has come to be associated with liability, not success.  However, true success is always vicarious, and that’s a central lesson of The Go-Giver.

Below are the 5 Rules of Vicarious Success as extrapolated from the The Go-Giver.

A guide for those who adhere to the Rules for Vicarious Success 

  1. ValueAdherents recognize the true measure of value is the extent to which the value given exceeds the payment received.

  1. InfluenceAdherents recognize influence exists and grows exponentially when the interests of others take precedence over their interests.

  1. CompensationAdherents recognize earnings are determined by how many people we serve and well we serve them.

  1. AuthenticityAdherents, as stewards of the Golden Rule, promise authenticity and advocate a covenant to develop skills that support conduct compatible with the Golden Rule.

  1. ReceptivityAdherents recognize the key to effective giving is taking personal responsibility for being ready willing and able to receive gifts from the Creator.

Leveraging and sharing great ideas is a central tenant of the the The Go-Giver. Accordingly, I encourage readers to link to and share this blog post.


Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website















Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Of Scorpions & Frogs




Advocates of building information modeling (BIM) and integrated project delivery (IPD) know the technology works.  It's the cultural piece that's broken.  So how do we fix it.  We create a smart built culture.

So why talk about Scorpions and Frogs?

That's a key piece of the puzzle.  You cannot have a smart built culture if stakeholders kill each other.  And that's what happens when a Scorpion asks a Frog for a ride.

For those unfamiliar with the fable of the scorpion and the frog, here's a summary.  

The scorpion approaches the frog and says, "Frog, can I hitch a ride across the lake?


The frog, relaxing along the shore line says, "Not no, but hell no!  Why would I carry a scorpion across the lake?  You'd sting me and I'd die."

The scorpion responds, "Frog, why would I do that?  If I sting you you'd die and I would drowned.  Why would I sting you if that means I'll die too?"

The frog, thinking it over, says "Ok, load up.  I'll carry you across the lake."

The scorpion climb's on the frog's back proclaiming, "Thanks frog, I really appreciate you help.  You won't regret it!"  The frog slides into the lake and starts the long swim to the far shore.  Halfway across the scorpion's stinger begins to quiver .... and suddenly he strikes, driving the stinger deep into the frog's back.

The frog screams, " ARRRGGGH, YOU FOOOOL!  YOU'VE KILLED US BOTH!  YOU IDIOT! WTF WERE YOU THINKING?"

The scorpion gazed across the broad calm waters of the lake.  Winking at the frog, the scorpion says, "It's in my nature."

Then the scorpion and the frog sink beneath the water.


So what does the fable of the scorpion and the frog have to do with a smart built culture?  Quite a bit. Unless you collect the scorpions' stingers at the door frogs are going to die. And if frogs try to ferry scorpions across the lack both scorpions and frogs will die  And painting a scorpion green won't solve the problem.  If you collect stingers from the scorpions then a smart built culture has a chance.  If advocates of a smart built culture continue to carry scorpions across the lake then such endeavors will fail.  If advocates of a smart built cultures lock up the scorpions' stingers then such endeavors have a chance to succeed. Pretty simple.

Let's talk about that next.
      

Welcome to the Collaborative Revolution!

James L. Salmon, Esq.
Collaborative Construction
300 Pike Street
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202
Summary of Services and James L. Salmon's CV


Office 513-721-5672
Fax 513-562-4388
Cell 512-630-4446
JamesLSalmon@gmailcom


Collaborative Construction Website
No Silos Website